Posts Tagged ‘Scientific Method’

April 22, 2016 @ 12:46 pm
posted by Barry Sideroff

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Direct 2.0 is not a technology-based platform. It’s our vision… our principles and the way we think. We follow a rigorous and disciplined methodology designed to increase our chances of achieving market success. While the process does vary from client to client and assignment to assignment, we almost always follow this path:

We ensure that your/our strategy is financially sound

Strategy is doomed from the start unless it is financially sound, i.e., can reasonably be expected to generate marketing ROI (MROI) within an available budget. We’ve developed models that can project outcomes based upon high, medium and low KPIs. We analyze the impact of winning, growing and retaining best customers based upon their present and future monetary value.

We optimize your routes-to-market and channels

We optimize direct (sales without intermediaries) and indirect (sales with intermediaries) routes-to-market, both B2B and B2C. Channel navigation is all about finding the shortest distance and most effective and efficient routes… direct, indirect, or both, while minimizing the potential for channel conflict and delivering sales at the lowest possible SG&A costs.

We assess the "customer journey"

Individuals, both business buyers and consumers, experience a brand through their interactions at various stages in their customer journey. These can include call center, digital user experience and social media/peer-to-peer interactions. Positive interactions at each stage enhance the brand while negative experiences degrade it. We assess the customer journey, be it direct or indirect, in order to increase sales, customer satisfaction and customer lifetime value.

We embrace the scientific method

The scientific method uses statistically valid control versus test methodology to test (prototype), validate and roll-out integrated marketing and sales efforts. Once initial benchmarks are established and growth projections calibrated (high, medium and low), changes over time can be documented. Consistent tracking, measurement and refinement will almost always yield increased MROI.

We find your “force multipliers”

While many refer to this as the “big idea”, we call it the force multiplier. Force multipliers are marketing and sales programs and assets which deliver MROI well beyond the revenue that can be directly attributed to them. They generate awareness in, interest for and desire to buy your products and services beyond the routes and channels in which they exist. There are various types of force multiples. We work with our clients to find and leverage them.

By the way, these steps need not be taken linearly and all may not be appropriate to the challenges you face. But it is the way we think about those challenges. It is what we call the art and science of Direct 2.0.  

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April 26, 2012 @ 7:20 am
posted by Barry Sideroff

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Our last blog explored the first three Direct 2.0 principles -- protecting and growing your brand, monetizing your customer relationships and ensuring ROI with a financially sound strategy. Now, we’ll provide detail on principles #4, #5 and #6 – embracing the scientific method; controlling the communications environment; and managing the “customer journey”.

 Embrace the scientific method

Always use statistically valid control versus test methodology. Once initial benchmarks are established and growth projections made (high, medium and low), changes over time can be documented. Consistent tracking, measurement and refinement will yield increased marketing ROI.

 Control the messaging environment

A complex communications messaging environment exists across all consumer and business segments. People receive impressions of all types via an infinite number of channel combinations. Harmonize those channels and use both online and offline media to optimize your sales outcomes and always measure returns at both the macro and micro levels.

Manage the customer journey

Individuals experience a brand through their interactions at various phases in their lifecycle. Positive interaction at each stage enhances the brand while negative experiences degrade it. Understand and control each phase of the journey to increase sales, individual satisfaction and customer lifetime value.

 In our final entry in the series, we’ll provide detail on #7, #8, #9 and #10, the last four of our ten principles -- mastering your data, analytics and measurement; moving from social points of presence to a full “social ecosystem”; making mobile marketing and sales work; and optimizing on both effectiveness and efficiency.

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